Uncategorized

Digital World

20160108_122318

Read More

By admin
Minimal design

bebas07

Read More

By admin
Unherd Presents XLR8R TOP 100 downloaded tracks of 2015 series

Our relentless love for new music and culture has always been a part of our workflow and design process.  Listening to different genres spanning from classical to electronic we love to constantly hear new melodies.  We mixed the XLR8R’s top 100 downloads of 2015 and will be uploading on the mixcloud page.  Listen and let us know what you thought!

We have already released 2 installments of the the TOP 100.  Stay tuned over the next few weeks as we count down the most wanted underground tracks of 2015.

f65a_1442297283_105732_6759e065e791031f1858ca351f57_1680x1050

#XLR8R #TOP100 #DOWNLOADS #MUSIC #MIXING #MIXCLOUD #TRAKTOR #TRAKTORPRO #UNherd #UNherdpro

 

Read More

By admin
4 Ways to Build Self-Confidence and Boost Your Performance
A brilliant article from Dr. Ivan Joseph on simple ways to build your self-confidence and positive self talk.  Having learned from Ivan in 2006-2007 as a part of the Graceland University Yellowejackets squad I am always excited to hear more from Mr.Joseph.  Enjoy the article and we will be sharing more about goal setting and positive self talk in the next week!
HAPPY

When I arrived at Ryerson University in 2008, I went from being a soccer coach to director of athletics at an institution with over 40,000 students and a reputation as one of the most innovative and entrepreneurial in Canada. I became overnight in charge of a department of 40 staff and a budget of $3 million. In the first year alone, I faced enormous challenges: learning the ropes of a senior administrative role, restructuring the department, raising the profile of athletics on campus and leading a student referendum to buy and renovate the iconic Maple Leaf Gardens into an industry-leading athletic facility. A special letter that I read over and over again that year helped me stay self-confident about my new role.

I call it my “self-confidence letter.” I wrote that letter at a high point in my career, soon after I coached the men’s soccer team at Graceland University in Iowa to its first national championship. One part of the letter reads as follows: “Congratulations, Ivan, on completing your PhD before turning 40,” while another reads: “The national championship is an incredible achievement. Well done!”

Seven years later, with student engagement at Ryerson at an all-time high and a nationally-ranked athletic program, I look back at the self-doubt I felt in my first year and am reminded of that letter — a symbol of the importance of believing in myself. Why? Because self-confidence lies at the heart of success.

2015-07-12-1436706651-9362913-DrIJo_2.jpg
Photo: Steph Grant

Self-Confidence Is a Skill

Self-confidence is the belief in your ability to accomplish the task at hand. Extensive evidence, including findings by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, shows this belief in oneself has positive impact on performance. Research shows that self-confidence is a universal skill that anyone can learn with little effort, not an innate ability reserved for the elite among us.

Here are four ways to help you develop the skill of self-confidence and boost your performance.

1. Repetition, Repetition, Repetition

As Malcolm Gladwell’s famous 10,000-hour rule tells us, skills develop through focused and repeated practice. Self-confidence is no different. You need to continually face and overcome reasonable challenges that reinforce your belief in yourself. Self-confidence doesn’t come from staying in your comfort zone, rather from pushing yourself to achieve at an appropriate next level. When you face increasingly difficult challenges, you build small amounts of self-confidence. You can then transfer that belief from one context to another.

You need to practice over and over and over again until the task is no longer novel. It’s like learning to drive a stick shift. At first, it’s all you can do to keep from stalling. Then, you begin to shift fluidly. Eventually, you can start up at a red light on a hill with a dump truck on your tail without sweat streaming down your face. Over time, with thousands of hours of practice, driving standard becomes second nature — and so is your belief in yourself.

2. Have Three Self-Affirmations 

Before I speak to a large audience or lead an important meeting, I use three affirmations: 1) “I am the captain of my ship and the master of my fate,” 2) “Nobody outworks me,” and 3) “I got this.” I use these phrases to create a positive mindset. This technique is so effective that I once had my soccer players write their own affirmations on a wristband they wore during games.

Research shows that a positive mindset alters performance. Athletes are stronger and more effective when they use positive self-talk. If you see them clap their hands after an error or miss, they are actively reclaiming a positive mindset. In business and industry, positive affirmations lead to a 37 per cent increase in sales and 19 per cent more efficient and accurate diagnosis for doctors.

Create three affirmations that put you in a positive frame of mind and repeat them regularly. Tape them to your bathroom mirror or keep them in your briefcase or desk — whatever works for you.

3. Write Your Own Self-Confidence Letter

Just as I did before starting at Ryerson, write to yourself in a time of success for inspiration when times get tough. There will always be new skills to learn, challenges to face and projects or roles that push you to your limit. Everyone has times when their performance is not what they’ve hoped. When that happens, pull out your letter and remind yourself of what you have achieved and why you believe in yourself.

4. Surround Yourself with Positive People

Everyone needs people who believe in them. Ray Kroc, the famous American business icon who transformed McDonald’s from a local restaurant chain to a worldwide conglomerate, found one such person when he was an underaged ambulance driver in World War I — a young man named Walt Disney. One of my greatest supporters is my partner Polly, who has believed in me from the start and who always reminds me not to let anyone — including a soccer coach who didn’t think I was any good — determine how I feel about myself.

We are highly influenced by the people around us. Lack of support and encouragement can infect us with self-doubt. Surround yourself with colleagues, family members, friends and teammates who reinforce your belief in yourself.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/dr-ivan-joseph/build-self-confidence_b_7779178.html

#DrIvanJoseph #Ryerson #HuffingtonPost #SelfConfidence #Confidence #NewYear #Resolutions #Goals #Psychology #SportsPsychology

Read More

By admin
Confident People See Setbacks As Feedback

 

Become a fan 

Award-Winning Performance Coach & Director of Athletics at Ryerson University

Ever wonder why some people crumble when they don’t get something right and others take it as motivation to work harder? The answer lies in how self-confident people interpret the feedback they get in the face of setbacks.

The best example I have comes from an inspiring and humble source — a young man named Kyle who traveled from Jamaica to try out for my Ryerson Rams soccer team.

Just before tryouts one year, Kyle came up to me and said, “Coach, I’ve got Rams tickets on my Dream Board. I know you won a national championship in Iowa. I want to be on your team.” I love a guy with conviction, so I invited him to tryouts. But he was awful. He had a rubber tree plantation for feet. So when he asked me how he did, I asked, “How would you like to be our equipment manager?” He was crestfallen, but he took the job. A couple of times in the season when we were winning by a lot, I put him in the game just to be nice.

When the season ended, I did exit interviews with the players. Kyle wanted an interview. Who interviews the equipment guy? What do you say? “You folded the pinnies well?” “You blew up the balls?” But I did it. Kyle put me on the spot: “Coach, what do I need to do to get better?” I knew I needed to be genuine: “You can’t juggle a thousand times, your feet are really, really stiff and you aren’t very strong. Oh, and there are three other All-Canadian centre-backs ahead of you.”

He sat there for a minute and said, “Yeah, but coach, you know, I think I can do those things, can I…?” That’s when I realized that I had to be really blunt: “Kyle, even if all the players in front of you went down, you’d probably only be on the bench.” I figured that would do it. But what did he say? “So, you’re saying there’s a chance?” I kid you not. I was thinking, “You will never make this team in a million years.” He was thinking, “I’ve got a shot!”

The next year, Kyle showed up for training camp in way better shape. He’d been lifting weights and running. He played better! But he didn’t make the team. There was no happy ending. He was even more devastated.

The year after that, my team needed center midfielders — a different position from the one Kyle played. I called a club coach I knew and he said he had a few guys he could send to the tryouts.

I’ll never forget that moment. My assistant coach and I were getting the drills set up when two guys came in from the parking lot. My spine started to tingle. One of them was Kyle! I thought, “Daggone it, bloody heck!” Then I said to myself, “Okay, Ivan, just relax. Humour him. No harm in that.”

Kyle tried out again. And again he just wasn’t good enough. But the other guy was. So, the next day while on the bus with the players, I got out my phone to call the other guy. When he answered, I explained that I wanted him to play in an upcoming game against Guelph. He said, “I’ll be there. Thanks, Coach. Just shoot me an email.” I said, “Okay, what’s your address?” “It’s Kyle dot…” Inside my head I thought, “Noooooo!” I had switched the numbers. I hung up the phone and thought, “Well, what can I do? He’s on the team now. But he’s not going to play. He’s going to sit on the bench.” So he came to the game. He sat on the bench.

And then the most bizarre thing happened.

One centre-back went down. A second centre-back went down. Then the third centre-back went down. I had no choice but to put Kyle in the game. And guess what? He was a man possessed. He was the best player on my team — by a long shot. Not only did he play in that game, but he also played in every game for the rest of the season.

The team went undefeated and ended up number two in the country — the highest ranking ever for the Ryerson Rams. When we played at the national championship, guess who was our starting centre-back? Kyle. I had cut him three times!

Confident people respond to failure by bouncing back and building their confidenceeven higher. They see the information they get after a setback as feedback to help them improve rather than affirmation that they are no good.

“So… you’re saying there’s a chance…”

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/dr-ivan-joseph/confidence-criticism_b_8760512.html

Read More

By admin
Ideas for ideas from a dopamine junkie

I just LOVE good ideas and that feeling of excitement in the stomach when you uncover something new, highly relevant and rich in potential; that moment when an idea takes over your brain and you can literally feel synapses connect. I can’t get enough of it. So let’s look at ideas to provoke ideation.

With a slightly more level-headed view on it, this ‘first-kiss’-like moment of creativity is just your body releasing a cocktail of chemicals. Its most important ingredient: ‘dopamine’, a neurotransmitter famous for sparking happiness, excitement and desire*.

But dopamine does more than that. It also makes our fantasy go wild, thinking up joyful circumstances. It fuels motivation as well as curiosity, sharpens our focus and drives us to roll up our sleeves to get ‘it’ done.

All of this is of incredible value for the creative process.

“How cool is this!? You have a great idea and your body rewards you with even more creativity.”

So as ideation feels great and comes quite handy in life and business, too, let’s look at a collection of some easy and practical ideas for ideas (let’s make this a hashtag #ideas4ideas):

Hijacking sports for creativity

Sport is another great trigger for releasing a great deal of ‘happy chemicals’. So how about using it purposefully when you are in need of a good idea? I came up with a training pattern which quite often works for me and which I described in this post. I don’t even need to schedule extra time for these #ideas4ideas sessions, because I’m doing my workout anyway.

Workouts can create space for the unconscious. It’s so powerful  – especially for creative problem-solving.

Workouts can create space for the unconscious. It’s so powerful – especially for creative problem-solving.

Noise cancelling mode for original ideas

Our world is full of distractions – and as a curious person I love it because every piece of information around me has the potential to inspire me. Distraction starts for most of us right after getting up in the morning. If you don’t have to take care of your kids, first thing in the morning for most people is checking the smartphone. You listen to the radio while taking a shower and watch TV during breakfast – this goes on and on until you go to bed.

But we need to tune this noise out from time to time if we are striving to come up with original ideas and thoughts.

Runtastic’s DONI method

At the adidas Group we’re all super stoked because Runtastic joined our team just recently and they’ve proven to be a very creative bunch of people. Since reading this article I know one of the reasons. In 2012 they introduced a monthly ‘Day of new ideas’ and have had it ever since. Read the article to get more details.

On Runtastic's 'Day Of New Ideas' the whole company presses pause on their regular activities and routines to collaborate on exploring new ideas, creating something new or improving something already in existence.

On Runtastic’s ‘Day Of New Ideas’ the whole company presses pause on their regular activities and routines to collaborate on exploring new ideas, creating something new or improving something already in existence.

The off-topic lunch

In business we often tend to go for lunch with the same people. After all, it’s our free time and we want to surround ourselves with people we enjoy the most. However, a lunch is a great opportunity to catch up with people from an area that is totally unrelated to your own field of expertise, too. I pretty much ALWAYS feel inspired after learning more about other challenges and views which are so foreign to my world. The amount of dopamine this releases helps me not to feel the after-lunch tiredness, too.

The Monty Python lesson

“It took me a while to learn not to be too pushy and demanding with myself with regard to coming up with great, creative solutions; because quite frequently the answer hits you when you are not thinking about the problem at all.”

Your unconscious diligently worked in the ‘off’, connected the dots and came up with a super creative idea. John Cleese aka Monty Python gave very interesting insights into this phenomenon during his speech at the ‘Content Marketing World 2015’ in Cleveland. His advice for letting this phenomenon happen is to give you deliberate and dedicated time to think without an agenda from time to time. Let your thoughts come and go – e.g. just stare out of the window to escape your mental rut. Give your unconscious a fair chance to help you. This article summarizes John Cleese’s entire talk very well. You also might want to check out Guy Claxton’s book “Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind” which John Cleese referenced, too (it’s still on my own reading list).

Let’s sum it up: What all of these thoughts have in common is to actively make room for creativity. Some ideas might just hit you. But the most creative people don’t leave their creativity to chance. They make room for it.

What are your #ideas4ideas? Leave a comment here.

*Disclaimer: I’m anything but a chemist. So don’t ask for details and leave a comment for corrections. Please don’t become too nitty-gritty, though. There is a reason why I’m not a chemist 😉

#Adidas #Dopamine #WorkOut #Creative #Motivation #UnherdPro #Design

Article: http://blog.adidas-group.com/2015/11/ideas-for-ideas-from-a-dopamine-junkie/

Read More

By admin
4 Ways to Build Self-Confidence and Boost Your Performance

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAM1AAAAJDA5NjE1YTMwLWY3YzUtNDkzOC1hZThjLWI2YWVkZGU2YWQ4Mw

I was fortunate enough to be coached by Ivan Joseph at Graceland University’s NAIA Soccer National Championship winning squad  in Iowa for 1 season before he left to become the Athletic Director at Ryerson.  I learned so much from this man and actually we all had a hard time when he told us he was leaving.  Amazing article about the ways anyone can build their self-confidence and practice it.

This post was originally published in the Huffington Post. 

When I arrived at Ryerson University in 2008, I went from being a soccer coach to director of athletics at an institution with over 40,000 students and a reputation as one of the most innovative and entrepreneurial in Canada. I became overnight in charge of a department of 40 staff and a budget of $3 million. In the first year alone, I faced enormous challenges: learning the ropes of a senior administrative role, restructuring the department, raising the profile of athletics on campus and leading a student referendum to buy and renovate the iconic Maple Leaf Gardens into an industry-leading athletic facility. A special letter that I read over and over again that year helped me stay self-confident about my new role.

I call it my “self-confidence letter.” I wrote that letter at a high point in my career, soon after I coached the men’s soccer team at Graceland University in Iowa to its first national championship. One part of the letter reads as follows: “Congratulations, Ivan, on completing your PhD before turning 40,” while another reads: “The national championship is an incredible achievement. Well done!”

Seven years later, with student engagement at Ryerson at an all-time high and a nationally-ranked athletic program, I look back at the self-doubt I felt in my first year and am reminded of that letter — a symbol of the importance of believing in myself. Why? Because self-confidence lies at the heart of success.

Self-Confidence Is a Skill

Self-confidence is the belief in your ability to accomplish the task at hand. Extensive evidence, including findings by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, shows this belief in oneself has positive impact on performance. Research shows that self-confidence is a universal skill that anyone can learn with little effort, not an innate ability reserved for the elite among us.

Here are four ways to help you develop the skill of self-confidence and boost your performance.

1. Repetition, Repetition, Repetition

As Malcolm Gladwell’s famous 10,000-hour rule tells us, skills develop through focused and repeated practice. Self-confidence is no different. You need to continually face and overcome reasonable challenges that reinforce your belief in yourself. Self-confidence doesn’t come from staying in your comfort zone, rather from pushing yourself to achieve at an appropriate next level. When you face increasingly difficult challenges, you build small amounts of self-confidence. You can then transfer that belief from one context to another.

You need to practice over and over and over again until the task is no longer novel. It’s like learning to drive a stick shift. At first, it’s all you can do to keep from stalling. Then, you begin to shift fluidly. Eventually, you can start up at a red light on a hill with a dump truck on your tail without sweat streaming down your face. Over time, with thousands of hours of practice, driving standard becomes second nature — and so is your belief in yourself.

2. Have Three Self-Affirmations

Before I speak to a large audience or lead an important meeting, I use three affirmations: 1) “I am the captain of my ship and the master of my fate,” 2) “Nobody outworks me,” and 3) “I got this.” I use these phrases to create a positive mindset. This technique is so effective that I once had my soccer players write their own affirmations on a wristband they wore during games.

Research shows that a positive mindset alters performance. Athletes are stronger and more effective when they use positive self-talk. If you see them clap their hands after an error or miss, they are actively reclaiming a positive mindset. In business and industry, positive affirmations lead to a 37 per cent increase in salesand 19 per cent more efficient and accurate diagnosis for doctors.

Create three affirmations that put you in a positive frame of mind and repeat them regularly. Tape them to your bathroom mirror or keep them in your briefcase or desk — whatever works for you.

3. Write Your Own Self-Confidence Letter

Just as I did before starting at Ryerson, write to yourself in a time of success for inspiration when times get tough. There will always be new skills to learn, challenges to face and projects or roles that push you to your limit. Everyone has times when their performance is not what they’ve hoped. When that happens, pull out your letter and remind yourself of what you have achieved and why you believe in yourself.

4. Surround Yourself with Positive People

Everyone needs people who believe in them. Ray Kroc, the famous American business icon who transformed McDonald’s from a local restaurant chain to a worldwide conglomerate, found one such person when he was an underaged ambulance driver in World War I — a young man named Walt Disney. One of my greatest supporters is my partner Polly, who has believed in me from the start and who always reminds me not to let anyone — including a soccer coach who didn’t think I was any good — determine how I feel about myself.

We are highly influenced by the people around us. Lack of support and encouragement can infect us with self-doubt. Surround yourself with colleagues, family members, friends and teammates who reinforce your belief in yourself.

 

#SelfConfidence #Skill #Building #Motivation #Psychology #SportsPsychology #UnherdPro

Read More

By admin
Word

STEFAN NEMANJA’S, TSAR OF SERBIA (Roi de Serbie, 1117 – 1199); TESTAMENT ABOUT LANGUAGE:
The words of Stefan Nemanja ( priest Simeon), said while he was dying,
written by his youngest son Rastko, Saint Sava (from the book “Stefan
Nemanja’s testament by the writer Mile Medic)

“Guard, my dear child, your language as you would your land. Language
can be lost just as castles, land and the soul can be lost.But what is a
people – if they lose their language, land, soul? Don’t take a foreign word
into your mouth. If you take a foreign word, you will not make it your own,but you will lose part of yourself. It is better to forfeit your grandest
and strongest castle than the smallest and the most insignificant word of
your language. Countries and states are not only conquered by swords, but by languages, too. A foreigner conquered and obedient you that much,
counting the words he stole from you and imposed his owns.

A people, who loses his words stops being a people. There is, my child,
an illness which attacks the language as the illness which attacks the
body. I remember such illnesses of the language. It exists most often at
the edge of a people, in a touch of one people with another one, in a place
where the language of one people touches the language of another one. Two people, my child, can fight and can reconsolidate. Two languages can never reconsolidate. Two people can live in the greatest peace and love, but their languages can only be at war. Whenever two languages meet and mix, they are like two armies in a battle to life or death.As long as both languages can be heard in this battle, the battle is equal, but if you
start hearing one language better and louder, that one will prevail. At
last, only one can be heard. The battle is over. There isn’t that people
after the language is lost. You must know, my child, that battle between
the two languages does not last for a day or two, as a battle between two
armies, or a year or two, as a war between two different people, but a
century or two, and this is such a small measure for a language, as it is a
moment or two for a man.

That is why, my child, it is better to lose all battles and wars , but
to lose the language. After a lost battle or lost wars there is people.
After a lost language there is no people. The language is, my child, harder
than any fortified wall. When the enemy breaks down your walls and towers do not despair, but maintain close watch over the language. As long as the language remains untouched, you have nothing to fear. Send your spies and merchants to villages and towns, let them just listen.

In the places where you can still hear our word, where our word is still
rotated like an old golden coin, you know, my child, it is still our land,
no matter who rules here. Emperors come and go, , states fall, but language and people are what remain. Sooner or later the conquered part of the land and the people will return to their linguistic and national homeland.

Read More

By admin
The story…

unehrd2

Read More

By admin
Unherd: it is an attitude

Go Harder iPad by Fudgegraphics

Read More

By admin